Searching for Justice in Appalachia: Part II

Big Rock, VA Photo byNick Mullins

In my original post, I skirted along the edges of some personal beliefs that I often spare my readership, beliefs that I must admit, cause me to doubt myself and this work. As I mentioned in my first post, one of the downsides to being a justice advocate is realizing just how bleak the situation can be. I get up every morning, wondering if we can ever truly achieve justice.

Just to recap, coal companies have billions in assets, lawyers on retainer, political campaign contributions, and they own the majority of our resources in Appalachia. Coal companies use the money they make from our resources to hire marketing firms, pay for advertising time on TV networks, and print thousands upon thousands of Friends of Coal stickers to convince us they are benefiting our communities. For many of us, it’s a struggle just to pay our bills and buy food, let alone stand up against it.

Acid Mine Drainage near Pound, VA - Photo by Nick Mullins

And then there’s something I don’t often admit. There are times I question whether we have anything left to fight for. Hundreds of thousands of acres have been surface mined. Millions of acres have been underground mined leaving voids that will eventually cause subsidence, sinking more wells in the decades to come, and creating more acidic mine drainage laden with heavy metals and whatever waste we left in there. Then there’s the billions of gallons of coal sludge dammed up in hollows all across Appalachia, and tens of thousands of natural gas wells belching out “residual waste” water.

The picture becomes even darker when I realize that the issues we have in Appalachia apply on a global scale. Everywhere there are natural resources to be had, companies have undertaken similar initiatives, and it’s all driven by the insatiable desire of millions and millions of people competing for social status and seeking all things comfortable and convenient. Add in all the social, racial, and environmental injustices that go along with it, and how the mainstream discredits justice seekers as eccentric or extremist and well… there just doesn’t seem to be any hope left out there in the world. I constantly go in and out of states of depression and the idea of throwing my hands in the air to run screaming into the woods where I would live out the remainder of my life as a hermit becomes more and more appealing.

But I never will. I can’t give up.

People on both sides of these debates are so often on the same page but don’t realize it, and therein lies some hope. Most folks working in extractive industries are conservationists, and that’s not a far cry from environmentalists. True, they’d rather be beaten about the head and shoulders with a roof jack than to be considered a “treehugger,” but many would stand up to preserve their hunting grounds or local lake. The problem always seems to be a break down in communications between environmentalists and the working class, and the industry always knows exactly where to place the dynamite on the bridges that are built between them. It’s always in the industry’s interests to keep people at odds—it’s been that way since the union days.

I’m going to keep trying to build those bridges. Some environmentalists consider me arrogant and self-serving when I criticize their methods, and some miners like to call me a “disgruntled employee” or a “treehugger,” but I’m none of it. What I am is crazy. Crazy enough to believe that if we can just clear away the bull****, we might have a chance at gaining our freedom, our land, and our children’s future back. This is where the rubber meets the road for me, this is where the past 20 years of my adult life comes to a head; getting up every morning, putting everything I have out there, taking the licks I get for opening my mouth, trying to scrape by on what little money comes our way, and forging ahead.

My will to keep fighting for justice must be engrained in my DNA. I keep hearing Chris Hedges in my head,

“Resistance becomes about something other than winning. It becomes about affirming who we are as human beings, understanding that if justice perishes, human life on earth has lost its meaning. It is a perpetual never ending struggle, and we’re called to that struggle. We are called to have faith that that struggle is worth it. Even if every indicator around us seems to say that it’s futile.”

All I can do is continue writing and doing what I know how to do, using what knowledge I’ve gained, and trying to find ways to make it financially as I do this work.

I just know that I’m not going to give up as long as there are good people out there still being taken advantage of—good people still being hurt. I’m not giving up because even if we only have one mountain left, one stream, it’s wrong for anyone to destroy it for money, forever taking it from our children. To me, that’s part of what being Appalachian is about.

Thanks to all those who’ve supported me over the years. I couldn’t have done it without you.

Solidarity Forever,

Nick

P.S. If you’re interested in supporting my work please shoot me a message using the  contact form, or check out the fundraising campaign for Breaking Clean on Indiegogo.

One thought on “Searching for Justice in Appalachia: Part II

  1. “and it’s all driven by the insatiable desire of millions and millions of people competing for social status and seeking all things comfortable and convenient. ” That is well put. Materialism. This is a term with a meaning by both the Christian and the revolutionary. So, it is a hard thing to fight against this self-destruction that is built into each of us. But I am glad that you are. I am, too. Keep it up!!

    Liked by 3 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s